30by30

30:30:30-Campaign

Our natural world is in trouble

This is no secret. Wildlife is disappearing at an alarming rate - some are calling it the next mass extinction - and the threat of climate catastrophe is a constant worry. We live in a time of emergency.

There is still hope - we can tackle both of these critical issues - but we have to act now. Time is running out. 

What needs to happen?

The Wildlife Trusts are calling for at least 30% of our land and sea to be connected and protected for nature’s recovery by 2030. Making more space for nature to become abundant once again will give our struggling wildlife the chance to recover and also restore beautiful wild places - places that store carbon and help to tackle the climate crisis.

30% is the bare minimum that nature needs to start recovering but we are far short of this and need your help to turn things around...

The Wildlife Trusts are calling for at least 30% of our land and sea to be connected and protected for nature’s recovery by 2030. Making more space for nature to become abundant once again will give our struggling wildlife the chance to recover and also restore beautiful wild places - places that store carbon and help to tackle the climate crisis.
30% is the bare minimum that nature needs to start recovering but we are far short of this and need your help to turn things around...
Craig Bennett
Chief Executive, The Wildlife Trusts

We can do this together

By joining our mission for nature's recovery, you will make a real difference to wildlife and our natural world. Every pound donated will help us achieve our vision for a wilder future. Together we can restore huge peatlands, which store carbon and become a home for threatened birds like curlews and golden plovers. We will create new wetlands, which reduce the risk of towns and villages flooding and are also great for dragonflies and water voles. We will plant new underwater seagrass meadows to soak up carbon and shelter sea horses and other sea life.  

Nature has given us so much, it's now our turn to give back.  

How we are helping to bring back nature in Cumbria

One of our projects to bring nature to more people is at Smardale Nature Reserve near Kirkby Stephen. These steep, wooded slopes are home to an important population of rare red squirrels. The nature reserve has recently been extended, and we plan a new and specialist feeding station to give visitors better views of these iconic animals. For those who can’t visit the nature reserve, we want to put up a new webcam, so people can enjoy watching red squirrels from online and at home. We also want to create family trails, offering a chance for younger visitors to develop a passion for nature, with ‘wild’ backpacks to borrow, packed for a day’s wildlife adventure. Find out more here.

Image of red squirrel at Smardale Nature Reserve

Red squirrel at Smardale Nature Reserve © Andrew Walter

Smardale Nature Reserve

Stunning scenery provides a backdrop to this wonderfully varied nature reserve that stretches from Newbiggin-on-Lune almost as far as Kirkby Stephen.

Restoring and improving wildflower meadows

We're improving 30 acres historic northern hay meadows for wildflowers at Bowber Head Farm near Ravenstonedale.

With their colourful flowers and herbs, the fields at Bowber Head Farm are very special. With only 900 hectares of northern hay meadows left in existence, these are the most threatened and vulnerable wildlife habitats in Cumbria.

We're plug planting and using ‘green hay’ to redistribute seeds around these precious 30 acres to restore them to top condition following a decline in the quality of the grasslands over the last 20 years. Find out more here.

Image of meadows at Bowberhead Farm

Bowber Head Farm © Cumbria Wildlife Trust

In summer the meadows at Bowber Head Farm are covered in swathes of pink, purple, yellow and white flowers and alive with the buzz and flutter of pollinating insects.

Connecting and creating habitats to Get Cumbria Buzzing

Get Cumbria Buzzing is a three year project (2019-2022) which aims to increase the abundance and diversity of pollinators across northwest Cumbria, connecting and creating habitats along ecological networks. Working closely with partners, local communities, and residents, we aim to create over 115 hectares of wildflower rich habitat for pollinators, at over 62 sites across our project area. Creating stepping stones of habitat will help link natural environments and green spaces together, enabling our pollinators to travel more freely across the landscape.

We are delighted to say that one year into the project, we’ve restored 83 hectares to create pollinator friendly habitat at 108 different sites across northwest Cumbria. With help from our partners, and northwest Cumbria residents and communities, we hope to exceed our project target of 115 hectares over the next two years. In addition to this, since creating the Cumbria Pollinator database in 2019, sightings of pollinators have been flooding in from across the county, with over 17,000 records being verified by county recorders via our local County Records Office: Cumbria Biodiversity Data Centre, already.

Connecting Staveley's Woodlands 

The beautiful ancient woodlands at Craggy Wood will now be protected for many years to come, thanks to our wonderful supporters who donated to the Save Craggy Wood Appeal. Craggy Wood has been purchased from The Lake District National Park and its future is safe. Over the coming months and years we will reconnect Craggy Wood with rest of the Staveley Woodlands, creating a fantastic wildlife corridor.  We now have a dedicated Staveley Woodlands Officer who is working with the local community to ensure this precious woodland is an even better place for wildlife and a great place for people to visit. Find out more here. 

Image of Staveley woodlands © Danni Chalmers

A misty morning in Craggy Wood © Danni Chalmers

Staveley Woodlands is a wonderful ancient woodland, including Craggy Wood and Dorothy Farrer's Spring Wood.