30by30

30:30:30-Campaign

Our natural world is in trouble

This is no secret. Wildlife is disappearing at an alarming rate - some are calling it the next mass extinction - and the threat of climate catastrophe is a constant worry. We live in a time of emergency.

There is still hope - we can tackle both of these critical issues - but we have to act now. Time is running out. 

What needs to happen?

The Wildlife Trusts are calling for at least 30% of our land and sea to be connected and protected for nature’s recovery by 2030. Making more space for nature to become abundant once again will give our struggling wildlife the chance to recover and also restore beautiful wild places - places that store carbon and help to tackle the climate crisis.

30% is the bare minimum that nature needs to start recovering but we are far short of this and need your help to turn things around...

The Wildlife Trusts are calling for at least 30% of our land and sea to be connected and protected for nature’s recovery by 2030. Making more space for nature to become abundant once again will give our struggling wildlife the chance to recover and also restore beautiful wild places - places that store carbon and help to tackle the climate crisis.
30% is the bare minimum that nature needs to start recovering but we are far short of this and need your help to turn things around...
Craig Bennett
Chief Executive, The Wildlife Trusts

We can do this together

By joining our mission for nature's recovery, you will make a real difference to wildlife and our natural world. Every pound donated will help us achieve our vision for a wilder future. Together we can restore huge peatlands, which store carbon and become a home for threatened birds like curlews and golden plovers. We will create new wetlands, which reduce the risk of towns and villages flooding and are also great for dragonflies and water voles. We will plant new underwater seagrass meadows to soak up carbon and shelter sea horses and other sea life.  

Nature has given us so much, it's now our turn to give back.  

How we are helping to bring back nature in Cumbria

One of our projects to bring nature to more people is at Smardale Nature Reserve near Kirkby Stephen. These steep, wooded slopes are home to an important population of rare red squirrels. The nature reserve has recently been extended, and we plan a new and specialist feeding station to give visitors better views of these iconic animals. For those who can’t visit the nature reserve, we want to put up a new webcam, so people can enjoy watching red squirrels from online and at home. We also want to create family trails, offering a chance for younger visitors to develop a passion for nature, with ‘wild’ backpacks to borrow, packed for a day’s wildlife adventure.

Image of red squirrel at Smardale Nature Reserve

Red squirrel at Smardale Nature Reserve © Andrew Walter

Smardale Nature Reserve

Stunning scenery provides a backdrop to this wonderfully varied nature reserve that stretches from Newbiggin-on-Lune almost as far as Kirkby Stephen.

Among our newer nature recovery projects is a 106ha site at Lowick Common near Ulverston. Stephen Trotter, CEO Cumbria Wildlife Trust, explains more

“Two years ago we took on the care and restoration of a large piece of land at Lowick. It’s very special because of the lowland heath, acid grassland and fen areas found here – they’re  all rare, both in Cumbria and nationally, having declined in the last century. They provide important habitats for specialist species, including small pearl-bordered fritillary butterfly and reptiles such as slow worms and adders.

The ponds are home to the medicinal leech -  one of the few places in Cumbria you can find these water-based, blood-sucking animals – as well as great-crested newts and 15 species of dragonfly and damselflies. In the trees and shrubs you can find redpoll, spotted flycatcher and yellow hammer.

We’ll be monitoring and surveying these species, to see the results of the management work that we carry out here. The site was dominated by bracken, which was shading out plants and birds, and invasive plants were covering paths, impeding visitor access.  Working with local volunteers, we’ll tackle these problems, to ensure that the site remains a wildlife haven for these specialist species and for future generations to enjoy.”